Gnial

A large island near the north pole; homeland of the Iómr Mnór and the Mlílrath. The coastline is rugged and mountainous, surrounded by wide beaches and jungles. The interior is sunken, wetter, and warmer. Shortened from Gnialradh, from Old Iómr Mnór Gialadh, Early Cnitnánsi Gréanland, English Greenland.

Below is an encyclopedia / dictionary of names and words from Gnial and the other human societies of the Cretaceous period. All terms are in the language of the Iómr Mnór (Gnin El) unless otherwise noted.

  • A
    • adúadh. pl. aduádhsa. Itinerant religious teachers of Ómnurrir who travel from homestead to homestead, bringing news and small assistance such as healing and ánéal renewal. From Old O ádrúád, Early C drúid, English druid.
    • Âeimcna. The continent straddling the equator, south and east of Gnial, south of the Sea of Yosrail. The continent in which humans evolved. Its northern half is mostly underwater, and its southern half is thick jungle, much hotter than modern temperatures. From Old W Âémica, Early C Âfric, English Africa.
    • After Arrival, AA. The name for the count of years since the researchers from modern times arrived in the Cretaceous period. The abbreviation “AA” is still traditionally used, although in Gnin El “after arrival” is now sreó atr.
    • Afoébdhroiéas Nál; Afoéb. Culture hero of the Ómnurrir, who carried the evil ring Róeulául to a volcano to destroy it. His story is told during the spring festival of Sálsšúor. From Afoébro+dhiéas nál+ua, Old O Áfródhrór+dhriyáts nán+husa, Early C Fródór, diyats, nán, husa, English Frodo, digits, nine, of.
    • Agríeghar. Name in Ómnurrir language for the Glándruruú wetlands. From agríeg+eghar, Old O aglíd+hevar, Early C glád+hevar, English glade+ever.
    • Alaúe. The Autumn fire festival of the Ómnurrir, at which the Council of Judges is held. From Old O Hâlawé, Early C Hâlawé, English Halloween.
    • Asšónsasáec. The Center Stones of the Fáus festival meeting places of Ómnurrir. The stones are set in different configurations in different festival settings, usually organized with a view to highlight the position of the sun at the festival time. From asšónsa+asáec, Old O ásthrónsar+hacsás, Early C stónsar, hâcsas, English stones, axis.
    • Ásdhaárš. The Star of Death, the mechanized planet-killing machine defeated by folk hero Úoar Ásárél in the epic told by the Ómnusrrir at their Nlálš ceremony. From ássar+dháš, Old O ásthrar+dhráth, Early C star, deth, English star, death.
    • ánéal. Plural ánéa. According the the traditions of Ómnurrir, a small personal spirit that guides them through life. From Old O hányal, Early C hányal, English angel.
    • Arâtsaq. Goddess in the pantheon of the Sasríl. Mother of Béqithtas and Nétsdhas. From Mid N Mrâzaq, Old S Mlear, Early C Mear, English Mary.
  • B
    • Béqithtas. An Earth goddess worshipped in Nusrawá; the primary diety of their pantheon. From Old S Briyatt, Early C Briyat, English Bridget.
    • Brevgaq. The name of the Wyúós Ha in the Sasríl language. From Old S Blugar, Early C bucar, English booker.
  • C
    • Canas. The king of the Sqécqas Sévslaf, chosen every five years by election from among the six chiefs. The Canas has broad powers for international relations and negotiations, but has no military power of his own; he must appeal to the individual chiefdoms for money and armaments. From Old S cran, Early C craun, English crown.
    • Cláil Stóram Ó. The capital city of the Iómr Mnór, built on high ground at the southern tip of Gnial, where it commands trade between Ómnurrir and Nusrawá. From Old W Cáilath Sturam Husa, Early C Cáéth Storm Husa, English cape, storm, of.
    • clalâth. Plural clârur. Among the Iómr Mnór, each person has two family names, the iamsre from the father’s side and the clalâth from the mother’s side. The iamsre family controls matters such as profession, marriage, spiritual life, and education, while the clalâth family controls children, home life, and physical possessions. From Old W clân, Early C clân, English clan.
    • Clalna. Monarchy of the Iómr Mnór. Established in the earliest days of the human colonization of Cnitnánsi, the Clalna took as its legitimate right to rule its ability to unite the families and clans under one government for mutual protection. From Old W calaca, Early C canc, English king.
    • Cnitnánsi. The name of the time period just before the impact at the K/T boundary. Also, collectively, the name of the human cultures stranded there by an accident from the early twenty-second century. From Old W Citási, Early C Critási, English Cretaceous.
  • D
  • E
    • éal, eáel, and foús. Three types of ánéal (guardian spirits) in the tradition of the Ómnusrís. Éal spirits are driven, fiery, and goal-oriented; eáel spirits are quiet, stubborn, and conservative; and foús spirits focus on the flow of connections and interrelations between things. From Old O yang, yán, fors, Early C yâng, yin, fors, English yang, yin, force.
    • Early Cnitnánsian. Language spoken by the humans of the Cnitnánsian period around 500 AA. The population was likely less than one hundred thousand at that time. Developed from the English spoken in the early twenty-second century. Over the next five hundred years, Early Scistetsian broke into three dialects, the ancestral languages of the Sasrâl, the Ómnurrir, and the Iómr Mnór.
  • F
    • Fáus. The collective name of the eight festivals held yearly among the Ómnurrir, during which tales, song, news, and goods of all kinds are traded, and marriages, deaths, and births are celebrated. The two largest festivals are the Nlálš (the Long Night, the Winter Solstice) and the Sálsšúor, held on May Day. From fáus+, Old O fást+fár, Early C fest, fár, English festival, fire.
  • G
    • Gátas Nâmnas. The head of the Sórqas church of Sasríl. Selected by the Council of Nuns (NâmaČâtsadh) as a life appointment. From Old N grátt nrun, Early C grát nun, English great nun.
    • Glándruruú. The vast wetlands that cover most of Ómnurrir, stretching from the northern coast down to the Sea of Wán in what is now Southern Canada, and then down either side of the sea to where it merges with the modern Gulf of Mexico. From Old W Gándasurhuúar, Early C Gládsarhevar, English Everglades.
    • Gnial. A large island near the north pole; homeland of the Iómr Mnór and the Mlílrath. The coastline is rugged and mountainous, surrounded by wide beaches and jungles. The interior is sunken, wetter, and warmer. From Old W Gialádh, Early C Gréanland, English Greenland.
    • Gnin El. The language of the Iómr Mnór in Gnial. From Old I gén, hálas, Early C grén, his, English greenish.
    • Gratas. Father-god of the Sasrâl. Although he is not generally worshipped in Sasríl, he is an important mythological figure, taking a role not unlike that of the Titans in Greek mythology. From Old N Glat, Early C Gad, English God.
  • H
  • I
    • iamsre. Plural iumsrinsur. Among the Iómr Mnór, each person has two family names, the iamsre from the father’s side and the clalâth from the mother’s side. The iamsre family controls matters such as profession, spiritual life, marriage, and education, while the clalâth family controls children, home life, and physical possessions. From Old W émaré, Early C fâmlér, English family.
    • Iúsur Mnór. The Book of Leaves. The holy book of the Iómr Mnór people, compiled from older sources such as the Bible, the Koran, the Tao Te Ching, and so forth, reworked as a narrative by semi-mythical culture hero Yath Mnesren around 1500 AA.
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
    • Mílas. The native name of the Mlílrath people of Gnial. From Old W Mílas, Early C más, English mice. Also, plural of mouse, a rodent of modern times, famous for its courage despite its small size, and its ability to frighten larger animals. (For the Cnitnánsi mammal of Ómnurrir named after the modern mouse, see mlalrath.)
    • mlalrath. Plural mlílrath. A small early mammal of Ómnurrir, similar in size and ecology to a modern mouse, though it is non-placental, and rather slower. From Old W malas, Early C maus, English mouse.
    • Mlílrath. The secondary culture of the island of Gnial, known for their ascetic, pacifistic way of life. Native name Mílas. From Old W mílas, Early C más, English mice.
    • Mnir Nsawatr. A meal shared by elderly or dying members of the Iómr Mnór culture with their children, enabling their memories to be passed down directly. It means “chapter meal”, and refers to the closing of a chapter of the eternal life of the family. From Old W mir sawatr, Early C mél sâptar, English meal chapter.
    • mlusal glaâl, “minimum gap”. A form of poetry developed in Gnial about 500 AA. Each line’s words are arranged such that the difference in sound between each is minimized. For example, the line “to thine own self be true” might become “true to own thine be self”. (In WH it would be “tnór tnór yó ath mni nsusri“, lit. “true to your own be self”.) Or “two roads diverged in a wood” might be “diverged wood two in a roads”. The poet has most control over the initial word, and care must be taken to emphasize the most critical word and generate an understandable line. Short function words (such as the tense particles) are often dropped entirely, and postpositions are usually ignored in the processing of the mlusal glaâl in order to make the meaning clear. For example, “two roads diverged in a wood” might be “swlina tnór sodrur wólrath el“, “diverge two roads wood in”, where el (“in”) does not fall under the mlusal glaâl rule.
    • Mnól. Earth’s primary satellite. In Cnitnánsi times, this moon is slightly closer, and appears larger in the sky. From Old W Mul, Early C Mún, English Moon. Compare with Earth’s other satellite, Udr.
    • mrâs a cluúar mnitnen. IM “back and cover between”. This saying refers to the back of one book on a shelf and the cover of the next, to convey feeling stuck between competing stories; somewhat like English “between a rock and a hard place.”
  • N
    • nâmnas. Pl. nâma. A highest-ranking priestess of the Sórqas church of Sasrâl. From Old S nrun, Early C nun, English nun.
    • NâmaČâtsadh. The Council of Nuns, 500 highest-ranking natsa of the Sórqas church of Sasrâl. The Gátas Nâmnas is elected by them to a life appointment. See nâmnas. From Old S nrun-čredsa, Early C nun-čedsa, English nun-heads.
    • Nétsdhas. God of youth, childhood, gifts, and idealism in the pantheon of the Sasrâl; son of Béqithtas. From Old S Nyézzad, Early S Yézas, English Jesus.
    • Nlálš. The Festival of the Long Night, held by the Ómnurrir on the longest night of the year, the winter solstice. During this festival is a three-night-long recitation of one of the greatest Ómnurrir epics, concerning the coming of the hero Úail Ásárél and his battle with the Ásdhaárš. From náš+laal, Old O náth+lang, Early C nát, long, English night, long.
    • Nóvnas. The name for the Sasrâl, inhabitants of Nusrawá (Zâqtsas), in their native tongue. Also, the name for their language. From Old S Nyúnyan, Early C Yúnyan, English Union.
    • nsail, pl. nsunrur. Pirate. From Old I sailadh, Early C swaédh, English swab.
    • nsoth clâtnath ó (song of kettle): Iómr Mnór phrase indicating a wake-up call, something that brings a problem to someone’s attention. clâtnath is from From Old I câtal, Early S cetal, English kettle.
    • Nusrawá. The name for the northwesternmost area of the southern continent, Yosrail, inhabited by the Sasrâl. From Old I Nurawá, Early C Norwár, English Norway.
    • nuthsir. Name for a variety of sea-dwelling dinosaurs, as large or larger than seagoing vessels. From Old W nusir, Early C nesér, English Nessie.
  • O
    • Obéosožiras. The name for the people of Ómnurrir in their primary own language, meaning people of spirit, referring to their belief that they are each protected by a guiding spirit. From obéo+asožiras, Old Ómnurrir óvéóval+ásóvirát, Early C pépal, spirit, English people, spirit.
    • Old Ómnurrir. Language spoken by the Ómnurrir people around 1500 AA. Ancestor of modern Ómnurrir language as well as the various dialects spoken in the wilder, southern parts of the continent.
    • Old Sasrâl. Language spoken by the Sasrâl people around 1500 AA, about thousand hundred years after they separated from the Iómr Mnór and journeyed to Nusrawá. Preceded by Late Sasrâl Cnitnánsi, Early Cnitnánsi, and English; succeeded by Middle Sasrâl and Modern Sasrâl.
    • Old Iómr Mnór. Language spoken by the Iómr Mnór people of Gnial around 1500 AA. Preceded by Late Iómr Mnór Cntnánsi, Early Cnitnánsi, and English; followed by Middle IM and Modern IM.
    • Ómouámtid. The commission charged with regulating trade among the homesteads of the Ómnurrir. From ómoum+átid, Old O ómord+átríd, Early C bord, trád, English board, trade.
    • Ómnurrir. The continents to the west of the Úinsen Ocean, stretching from pole to pole. Generally Ómnurrir refers to the northern area of the continents, corresponding to the North American plate. On either side of the Glándruruú and its interior ocean, the Sea of Wán, the continent is edged by mountains. The southern area, mostly south of the equator, is called Ómnurrir Nsânath, or South Ómnurrir. The northernmost region of Ómnusrís, nearest to Gnial, is called Yócnath. From Old IM Umuris, Early C Americ, English America.
    • Ómoátíd. The commission charged with regulating trade among the homesteads of the Ómnusrís. From ómo+átíd, Old O ómord+átríd, Early C bord, trád, English board, trade.
    • Usruthsramni. A common name of the monarchs of the Iómr Mnór, held by both kings and queens. From Old IM Uruzrami, Early C Ilizabi, English Elizabeth.
    • Oth Sea. The ocean between Gnial and Ómnurrir. Named after the large flightless semi-aquatic bright-beaked birds there, the oth (see). From English auk.
    • oth. Pl. oth. A large flightless semi-aquatic bright-beaked bird inhabiting the Oth Sea between Gnial and Ómnurrir. Its plumage is adapted for swimming and warmth. Not unlike the Great Auk. From Old W hos, Early C hoc, English auk.
  • P
    • Prâtéqcaq. A warrior-saint of the Sasríl pantheon, consort of Béqthtas. From Old N Plâtricc, Early C Pâtric, English Patrick.
  • Q
  • R
    • RalasTáfras. The main council chambers of the Six Chiefdoms of the Sasríl. It consists of a great vaulted hall and a large round council table, at which the six chiefs can sit equally. From Old N raanTráfal, Early S rauan, tábal, English round, table.
    • Róeulál. An evil ring of power, carried by Afoéb Nál to destruction in a volcano in the Ómnurrir epic tale sung at the yearly spring festival of Sálsšúor. From róel+uául, Old F rónc+wán, Early S ranc, wun, English ring, one.
  • S
    • saéamtr. Plural saémtnsur. A type of raptor dinosaur common to the arctic during the Cnitnánsi period, known for its speed and cunning. Adopted as the name of one of the clalâth of the ruling families of the Iómr Mnór. From Old IM raématr, Early C râptar, English raptor.
    • Sálsšúor. The Spring Sun, celebrated by the Ómnurrir at the height of spring (May Day), at which is told the epic of the evil ring Róeulál. From sál+asšúor, from Old O sán+ásprónc, Early C sun, spranc, English sun, spring.
    • Saréalduádhsa. A Council of Judges that meets yearly at the autumn festival Alaúe to adjudicate matters relating to the relations between the Ómnurrir homesteads. From saréal+aduádhsa, Old O sarhyal+ádrúádsar, Early C sarcal, drúidsar, English circle, druids.
    • Sasrâl. The people of Nusrawá, the region of the continent of Yosrail closest to Gnial. The area was settled by 1500 after extensive warfare between the Sasrâl and the Iómr Mnór. The term is considered somewhat derogatory; their own name for themselves is Nóvnas. From Old W Čarâlath, Early C Čeléth, English help, called so because they are culturally derived from a revolt of the lower classes.
    • Sasrâl Exodus of 1373. The beginning of the great migration of Sasrâl people from Gnial to Nusrawá after the Sasrâl Wars. The exodus continued until the mid-1400s and the foundation of the Sqécqas Sévslaf. In Iómr Mnór, Sasrâl Iemlé (“flight”).
    • Sasrâl Wars. Between 1278 and the mid-1300’s, a series of brutal wars between the Iómr Mnór and separatist Sasrâl sects in various parts of Gnial, culminating in the Sasrâl Exodus of 1373. In Iómr Mnór, Sasrâl Wuthsur; in the Sasrâl tongue, BrevgaqMómóc.
    • Sórqas. The main recognized church of the Sasríl in the Sqécqas Sévslaf. Headed by the Gátas Nâmnas (the Great Nun), it controls aspects of Sasríl life such as possessions, professional and social work, and the spiritual life. From Old S srars, Early C sars, English church.
    • Sqécqas Sévslaf. The Six Chiefdoms of Nusrawá. Founded in 1469, the Six Chiefdoms meet yearly for consultation at the RalasTáfras council chambers, and select a Canas every five years to guide them in external affairs. Somewhat like the Holy Roman Empire with parallel church/state structures and strong, growing middle class, and distant trade cities in the Yosraíl Sea. Old S srics, srévsam; Early C sics, séfdam; English six, chiefdom.
  • T
    • tneathmne. Plural tneathmlunsur. A kind of tyrannosaur common to the polar regions of Cnitnánsi, twelve feet long and covered with white pin feathers like fur. Adapted to cold temperatures, long famine, and darkness, it can see exceptionally well in the dark and has excellent smell. Known as Boreonykus to 21st century science. Adopted as the iamsre name of one of the ruling families of the Iómr Mnór. From Old W táathme, Early C tárantber, English tyranno-bear.
  • U
    • Udr Earth’s secondary satellite. Captured in the last few million years, its exact composition and origin is unknown, but is likely to be a comet. Although it is called a “moon”, its small size makes it appear more like a very bright star, visible sometimes during the day. The moon’s erratic orbit causes volcanoes, earthquakes, and atmospheric disturbances. Udr is expected to impact the Earth in the next few thousand years, causing extinction of 75% of all species. From Old W Hudr, Early C Hudar, English Other, i.e. “other moon”.
    • Úinsen Ocean. The ocean south of Gnial, stretching between the Earth’s two polar regions, separating the Ómnurrir continents from Yosrail and Âeimcna. Called the Atlantic in modern times. From Old IM Húsen, Early C Hósan, English Ocean.
    • Úoar Ásárél. A folk hero of the Ómnusrís. His epic is sung during the festival of the Nlálš. Traditions vary as to whether he was a real individual, and whether he lived in modern times or Cnitnánsi. From úoar ásár+áél, “walker sky-in”, Old O wohyar áshyár+hán, Early C wocar, scár, hin, English walker, sky, in.
    • uódhuáld, the written word in the language of the Ómnurrir. Literally “dead words”. They abhor writing, preferring the oral arts. From uóul+dhád, Old O wódsar+dhrád, Early C wardsar, ded, English words, dead.
    • Usad. The primary diety of the Wyúós Ha, “Lord”. Usad’s deeds, character, and commandments are explored in depth in the Íyús Ha of Yath Wúeren. From Old W Urad, Early C Lord, English Lord.
  • V
  • W
    • Wath Lrie Lre. The Book of One Leaf Life (lit. “One Leaf Life”, shortening of Mnór Wath Lrie Lre Ó, “Book of One Leaf Life”), a book maintained by each family of the Iómr Mnór people as a record of their life, deeds, and major events, passed from parents to children. Each child has two such books, one from their father and one from their mother, the iamsre side and the clalâth side respectively.
    • Wán, Sea of. The ocean covering what will become, in modern times, the Great Plains of the United States, reaching from southern Canada down to merge with the future Gulf of Mexico. The sea is shallow and teeming with all kinds of wildlife. From Old W Wlán, Early C Plán, English Plain, Great Plains.
    • Iómr Mnór. The People of the Book. The primary culture of the land of Gnial. So-called because of the holy book, Iúsur Mnór, the Book of Leaves, which contains the foundation of their culture, and the Wath Lrie Lre (one leaf / one life) books maintained by each family. From Old I Émós Mus, Early C Fóc Buc, English folk, book.
  • X
  • Y
    • Yosrail. The name of the continent southeast of Gnial, across the Úinsen Ocean. Inhabited since about 1000 AA by the Sasrâl. Old W Yorailath, Early C Yuraéth, English Europe.
    • Yosrail, Sea of. The shallow sea covering most of modern Europe. Only some regions of the British Isles, the Alps, and the Pyrenees rise above the waters.
    • Yath Mnesren. Culture hero of the Iómr Mnór; legendary compiler of the Iúsur Mnór in about 1500 AA. Yath’s description, Mnesren, means “the Barren”, referring to his lack of children, one of the greatest curses that can befall a member of the Iómr Mnór. Name Yath is from Old W Yal, Early C Yan, English John.
    • Yócnath. The name of the region west of Gnial, across the Oth Sea, in northeastern Ómnurrir. It is low, sandy, and swampy, the northernmost edge of the continent-spanning wetlands known as the Glándruruú. From Old IM Yucal, Old C Yúcan, English Yukon.
  • Z
    • Zâqtsas. The name for the homeland of the Sasrâl in their native tongue; called Nusrawá in Iómr Mnór. It lies south and west of Gnial, thickly jungled and mountainous, in the area of modern Scandanavia. From Old Sasrâl Egzasa, Early C Ecsada, English Exodus.